Carbs in Avocado – What is the Best Keto Fruit?

Can I have Fruit on Keto?

How do you know if a fruit is good for keto? Have you ever Googled: “are bananas keto” or “carbs in avocado”? This guide ranks nearly every fruit based on its carb count and how easy it is to incorporate into a ketogenic diet. Knowing carbs in fruits is important, but so is knowing the amount of carbs relative to the serving size. A 100 gram serving is 1.5g of net carbs in avocado but how much is 100 grams? Each fruit listed below also gives an estimate of what a typical 100 gram serving of that fruit looks like.

Evolution of Fruit

Over the last 9,000 years of agriculture, farmers have developed modern versions of fruits and vegetables that are larger, sweeter, and more convenient for consumption. One reason that people believe eating an abundance of fruit is healthy is that it is natural. However, our ancestors would not have access to fruit 365 days a year in every part of the world.

Consuming fruit every day is not natural from an evolutionary perspective. Additionally, when they did consume fruit, it was lower in sugar, especially fructose.

In our modern society, it is easy to get nearly any fruit in any grocery store, at any point in the year. However, the price of the fruit usually fluctuates depending on if it is in season or not. When you buy fruit on sale, that most likely means that it is in season and is readily available. On the other hand, if a container of blackberries is twice as expensive as normal, it probably had to be shipped halfway across the world just to get there.

Instead of purchasing and consuming fruit all throughout the year, take notice of when your favorite low sugar fruits are in season and enjoy them. Once they go out of season, remove that fruit from your diet. Eating what is in season, and what is local to your part of the world is better for the environment, better for your wallet, and more natural to our diets.

How to Consume Fruit

When consuming fruit on a ketogenic diet, it is especially helpful to portion out servings of the fruit to avoid over-consuming and exceeding your carbs for the day. Instead of snacking on the entire container of raspberries, put a small serving in a bowl, and enjoy them slowly and mindfully.

Never consume just the juice of a fruit. Juicing a fruit removes the fiber and therefore the aid that allows your body to slowly absorb the sugar is no longer present. Drinking fruit juice will have a more severe impact on your blood glucose than consuming the actual fruit.

When you eat fruits, it can be beneficial to have them in combination with a fat source. For example, I occasionally enjoy a small serving of blueberries with homemade whipped cream. The fat from the cream will keep me satiated and the blueberries provide the sweetness. Especially if you are fat adapted, having a snack or dessert that is pure carbs can leave you feeling unsatisfied, tired, and craving more carbs.

Alternatives to Fruit

If you snacked on fruit regularly before keto, it can be difficult to find alternative snacks. Fortunately, a ketogenic diet often allows you to feel satiated enough to not need to snack throughout the day. However, if you are still breaking your habit of snacking, check out my low carb snack guide or my guide to nuts on keto for some great alternatives to fruit.

Best

Avocado

Macros (100g serving):
167 calories
15.4g fat
8.6g carbs (1.8 net)
2g protein

Avocado is arguably the best fruit for keto because it has the most fat of any other fruit, except olives. The carbs in avocado fruits come in at only 1.8 net carbs, which is the lowest of almost any other fruit. Additionally, avocados are a great source of plant-based potassium. You can check out my article on electrolytes for more information about the importance of potassium. 

A 100g serving of avocado is about ⅔ of a medium-sized fruit.

Olives

Not many people think of olives as a fruit, especially since they are not sweet. That being said, olives are one of the best fruits for a ketogenic diet because of their high fat content. There are hundreds of varieties of olives, and many can be found by the pickles in the grocery store, or some store even have an olive bar. Don’t waste your time looking in the produce section for these!

Olives are a great snack on their own, paired with cheese and nuts, in a casserole, or as a topping to a dish. They are versatile, and a delicious source of fat. I love these single serving packs of olives to pack in my lunch, or take on the go for a quick snack.

Olives are a great source of sodium. On a ketogenic diet, getting adequate amounts of sodium is very important. If you are not salting your meals, make sure to eat salty foods like olives or pickles regularly.

Mission Black

Macros (100g serving):
115 calories
10.7g fat
6.3g carbs (3.0 net)
0.8g protein

I enjoy eating black olives by themselves, on nachos, or tacos. They are a great savory addition to any meal for extra fat.

These usually come pitted when purchased. There are several varieties of black olives aside from mission, such as nicoise and nyon.

Green

Macros (100g serving):
145 calories
15.3g fat
3.8g carbs (0.5 net)
1g protein

Green olives are actually black olives that have not yet fully ripened. As a result, they have a firmer texture. Green olives range in varieties such as castelvetrano, ceringnola, and manzanilla, to name a few. Each has a unique flavor profile.

I love finding varieties of stuffed olives at my grocery store. You can find olives stuffed with pimentos, cheese, or garlic. I’d recommend giving these a try for a tasty keto snack!

Kalamata

Macros (100g serving):
300 calories
30g fat
13.3g carbs (6.6 net)
0g protein

Kalamata olives are a deep purple color and usually have a distinctive smoky flavor. Kalamata olives can be purchased with or without the pit. I prefer pitted, simply because they are more convenient to eat.

I love topping salads with kalamata olives because they have such a unique flavor.

Blackberry

Macros (100g serving):
43 calories
0.5g fat
9.6g carbs (4.2 net)
1.4g protein

The peak season for blackberries is typically July to August in the United States.

Many people do not like blackberries because they are too tart and not sweet enough. However, if you enjoy the taste, blackberries are easy to incorporate on a ketogenic diet. I will occasionally have a small bowl of blackberries for dessert, especially when they are in season and on sale at the grocery store.

A 100g serving of blackberries is 15-20 berries.

Raspberry

Macros (100g serving):
52calories
0.7g fat
11.9g carbs (5.4 net)
1.2g protein

Raspberries are in season in the US in June and July. They are a great low-sugar dessert option on keto. A 100g serving of raspberries is about 20 large or 50 small berries.

Strawberry

Macros (100g serving):
32 calories
0.3g fat
7.7g carbs (5.5 net)
0.7g protein

Strawberries are number 1 on the Environmental Working Group’s list of produce with the highest pesticides. If you eat strawberries, make sure to buy organic if possible to avoid these pesticides.

The peak season for strawberries is April through June.

A 100g serving of strawberries is approximately 9 medium-sized berries.

Coconut Meat

Macros (100g serving):
354calories
33.5g fat
15.2g carbs (6.2 net)
3.3g protein

Coconut is a drupe, which is a fruit with a central stone inside that contains the seed.

Many forms of coconut are great for the ketogenic diet, such as coconut oil, coconut flour, coconut butter, and more. Check my guide to nuts on keto for all of the best forms of coconuts.

The “meat” or “fruit” of the coconut is the white, edible part of the coconut. Among several things, coconut meat can be shredded to make coconut flakes, extracted for oil, or eaten plain. The meat of the coconut is higher in carbohydrates than berries or other low sugar fruits. However, it also contains a lot of fat and can be a satisfying snack or dessert on keto.

A 100g serving of raw coconut meat is approximately ¼ of a medium sized coconut.

Decent

Blueberry

Macros (100g serving):
57 calories
0.4g fat
14.5g carbs (12.1 net)
0.7g protein

Blueberries are higher in carbs than other berries on keto. However, they are smaller than other fruits. Blueberries can still easily be enjoyed in moderation on a keto diet.

My favorite way to eat blueberries is simply with whipped heavy cream on top. 

A 100g serving of blueberries is approximately 60-70 berries.

Lemon

Macros (100g serving):
29 calories
0.3g fat
9g carbs (7.2 net)
1.1g protein

I’ve never known someone to eat a lemon in its whole form. If that’s something you enjoy though, it is fine to have in moderation on keto. A 100g serving of lemon is approximately two small lemons.

Watermelon

Macros (100g serving):
30 calories
0.2g fat
9g carbs (7.6 net)
0.6g protein

Watermelon has very high water content and can be very refreshing on a hot day. However, the carbs can add up quickly, so be mindful when consuming.

Honeydew

Macros (100g serving):
36 calories
0.1g fat
9g carbs (8.1 net)
0.6g protein

Growing up, I always thought honeydew was just cantaloupe that never ripened properly. I would never eat it because of the green color. Now, I don’t eat it because of the sugar content. A 100g serving of honeydew is only about 1/8th of a small melon.

Cantaloupe

Macros (100g serving):
39 calories
0.3g fat
10g carbs (8.5 net)
0.9g protein

Cantaloupe is a sweet melon that is often found in fruit salads along with honeydew, grapes, and other fruits. In my experience, they are either sweet and crisp, or mushy and gross. Either way, they have a relatively high sugar content, so be wary when consuming them on keto. A 100g serving is approximately 1/8th of a melon.

Peach

Macros (100g serving):
39 calories
0.3g fat
10g carbs (8.5 net)
0.9g protein

If there’s not much holding you back from devouring an entire bowl of fruit, a peach may be a good option to satisfy your fruit craving because you can grab a small one and know that once you have finished it, that’s it. This is better than cutting up a giant cantaloupe or other large fruit and attempting to portion it out.

A 100g serving is a little less than one small peach.

Plum

Macros (100g serving):
46 calories
0.7g fat
11.4g carbs (9.3 net)
0.7g protein

Similar to a peach, if you are seriously craving a piece of fruit, grab a small plum. If you have been keto for a while, it will take a small amount of fruit to satisfy a sweet craving, because your palate has changed so much that many foods will taste significantly sweeter than you remember.

A 100g serving is approximately equal to one large plum, or two small plums.

Grapefruit

Macros (100g serving):
42 calories
0.1g fat
11g carbs (9.4 net)
0.8g protein

With grapefruit, it can be easy to over-do it unless you portion out your serving beforehand. A large grapefruit is approximately 330g, which is almost 40g of carbs!

100g of grapefruit is approximately half of a small fruit.

Orange

Macros (100g serving):
47 calories
0.1g fat
12g carbs (9.6 net)
0.9g protein

There are plenty of other ways to get vitamin C from a ketogenic diet aside from oranges, so don’t that be your reason for indulging. A small orange once in a while will not hinder progress greatly. However, make sure that you are consuming the whole fruit, not just the juice. Having only the juice of fruit strips away all of the fiber which is what allows your body to slowly raise blood sugar over time, rather than spike it suddenly.

A 100g serving is about the size of one small orange.

Nectarine

Macros (100g serving):
44 calories
0.3g fat
11g carbs (9.7 net)
1.1g protein

A small nectarine is about 120g, so a 100g serving would be a little less than a full small nectarine.

If your goal is to stay under 20g of net carbs per day, a small nectarine will account for half of your daily intake. That being said, if the rest of your day is filled with zero carb foods, indulging in a small nectarine once in a while will not hinder your progress.

Worst

Clementine

Macros (100g serving):
47 calories
0.2g fat
12g carbs (10.3 net)
0.9g protein

I grew up taking one or two of these “cuties” in my school lunches in the winter time. They were always a “great source of vitamin C” to keep from getting sick during flu season. However, I now know that there are better ways to get vitamin C, like beef liver. I would avoid clementines on a ketogenic diet unless it is your only source of carbs for the day.

A 100g serving of clementine is approximately one and ¼ clementines.

Cherries (pitted)

Macros (100g serving):
50 calories
0.3g fat
12g carbs (10.4 net)
1.0g protein

A 100g serving of cherries is a little less than half a cup.

Cherries have quite a lot of sugar in them, and the carbs can add up fast if you aren’t careful. If you decide to have a few, be aware of the serving size and don’t overdo it.

Kiwi

Macros (100g serving):
61 calories
0.5g fat
14.7g carbs (11.5 net)
1.1g protein

With almost 15g of carbs in a serving, kiwi not a great option for keto. Just one kiwi fruit will be about 10g of carbs, which is a lot considering the small size of the fruit.

A 100g serving of kiwi is about 1 ½ of a fruit.

Apple

Macros (100g serving):
52 calories
0.2g fat
14g carbs (11.6 net)
0.3g protein

A 100g serving of apple is one “very small” apple, which is approximately 2 ½” in diameter. Most of the apples I find in my grocery store are twice this size. After being on keto, I have noticed that apples are almost unbearably sweet. We have bred fruit to become sweeter, and larger, and I find this to be especially true in apples. Since apples are so high in sugar and carbs, they are not a good option for a keto diet.

Pineapple

Macros (100g serving):
50 calories
0.1g fat
13g carbs (11.6 net)
0.5g protein

A 100g serving is two thin (½”) slices of pineapple.

Pineapple is very sweet and sugary and the carbs will add up fast. It’s best to avoid this fruit on keto because it can quickly cause you to go overboard on your carb limit.

Pear

Macros (100g serving):
57 calories
0.1g fat
15g carbs (12.9 net)
0.4g protein

A 100g serving is approximately ⅔ of a small pear.

An entire small pear contains nearly 20g of carbs, which is the amount that a lot of people try to stay under while doing keto. Therefore, pears are not a great option if you’re looking for a keto fruit.

Mango

Macros (100g serving):
60 calories
0.4g fat
15g carbs (13.4 net)
0.8g protein

A 100g serving is about ⅓ of a mango.

An entire mango can contain over 45g of carbs. To just have a 100g serving would be difficult, and even that has a lot of sugar. Mango is not a good fruit for keto.

Grapes

Macros (100g serving):
67 calories
0.4g fat
17g carbs (16.1 net)
0.6g protein

100g of grapes is approximately 20 grapes.

It would be easier to incorporate grapes into a keto diet, because they are small and can be portioned out. However, in just 20 grapes there are 17g of carbs. One or two grapes from a fruit salad at a potluck will be fine but avoid purchasing an entire bag at the grocery store.

Pomegranate

Macros (100g serving):
83 calories
1.2g fat
19g carbs (15 net)
1.7g protein

A 100g serving of pomegranate is ⅓ of a full sized fruit.

Pomegranate is a fruit that I would avoid altogether on keto. It is very high in sugar and there are better, more nutrient-dense foods and fruits that are lower in carbs.

Banana

Macros (100g serving):
89 calories
0.3g fat
19g carbs (15 net)
1.7g protein

A 100g serving of banana is a small banana approximately 6” in length.

I did not think bananas were sweet before keto, but I have now noticed how sugary they taste, and for good reason! One small banana has more carbs in it than many people on keto like to have in a single day. Bananas are not good fruits to consume on a ketogenic diet.

Conclusion

The best options for fruit on keto will be savory fruits like avocado and olives. For a sweet low-sugar fruit, opt for a small bowl of berries. Avoid large melons and pineapple because carbs can add up fast unless the serving is pre-portioned.

Fruit can have a place on a ketogenic diet, but it should not be a primary source of nutrition. Fruit is “natures candy” and can be treated as something to have in moderation on a special occasion.

 

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